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  R.I.P.       GOLD    
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Franklin Jarlett lived in Pennsylvania, USA. He was 48 when he was diagnosed in November, 1995. His initial PSA was 60.00 ng/ml, his Gleason Score was 7, and he was staged T1c. His choice of treatment was Non-Invasive (Active Surveillance). Here is his story.

I was diagnosed in November 1995 with a PSA of 60. I was, of course, felled by the news. My experiences from then on proved several things, that prostate cancer is highly treatable and that doctors' prognoses are simply a statistical number they have invented to scare people into thinking that they are in imminent danger of dying.

My experiences with the medical industry in the past decade have led me to my previous statement. I have been a member of an online PC support group, which has opened the door to information about prostate cancer that is not easy to find. For instance, there are several different ways to approach prostate cancer that don't involve the kinds of medical interventions that I was finally forced to accept.
There is much to learn about prostate cancer, and the medical knowledge about the disease's origin is still in its infancy. Although interventions like hormone blockade (HB) work for a period of time, I believe that HB is a shotgun approach to dealing with the disease. My current information indicates that prostate cancer is more a result of hormonal imbalances than anything else. Furthermore, our diets, especially those who love meat, cheese, butter, and other dairy products, provide an amply menu to facilitate the hormonal imbalances that result in prostate cancer.

My consultation in November, 1995 with the lead urologist at a nearby hospital yielded only one sad outcome. He gave me two years. I left the office disconsolate and began to arrange my affairs. However, within a short time, I learned that lifestyle is key to the development of this disease.

I underwent a radical change in diet for quite some time, while watching my PSA and monitoring my health. Everything went well for ten years, when I developed bone metastases. I underwent hormone therapy, which is currently in its twelfth month. The metastases are reversed, and I feel wonderful. I am taking a number of supplements that slow down the progression of the cancer, and I am planning on stopping hormone therapy in a short time. From then on, I will proceed full force with as many proven alternative medicine regimens that I can afford.

In my case, the cancer was immediately reduced upon commencing hormone therapy, evidenced by improved urinary function. A recent urologist gave me a DRE recently and said he wouldn't have known that I had prostate cancer unless I had told him so.

For those with PC, I would tell them to radically alter their diets and adopt a natural diet. I would tell them to accept medical treatment if there were imminent danger of something bad happening, such as a very high PSA, biopsied prostate gland indicating the gleason score. But as important as it is to know when to intervene with medical interventions that have a pricetag in reduced life span, it is also just as important to correct the dietary lifestyle that in part led to the cancer.

I used to love dairy products and for several years, cheese was my main source of protein. Before and after that, I have been a lover of all things made with butter. The problem is that my love of all things fat led me to overindulge in them on a chronic basis. I used to eat two rib eye steaks several days a week, followed by large amounts of cheese. I could easily eat an entire cheese cake at a sitting, and when I used to make cheese cakes for the family, I would always add one more stick of butter to the mixture.

As a child, I used to eat junk food everyday to excess; five packages of Reese's Peanut Butter Cups, no problem; five Butterfingers, easy. A quart of ice cream, no sweat. I used to search the city far and wide for the largest sandwiches, and as a teenager I used to often order a double order of meat in the sandwich. What was the result of all this? Benign Prostatic Hyerplasia had begun before I had reached my 21st birthday. The end result of long-term BPH? In my case, it was prostate cancer.

There are alternative medicine supplements that have been tested in clinical trials and proven to increase killer cell activity and reduce tumor growth. If your job is stressful, try to find another one. I know that for myself, my job stress was extremely high in the year before I developed bone metastases and I also believe that stress can cause cancer, especially stress that is enervating. I am much happier since I left my last job.

FRANKLIN NEVER RESPONDED TO REMINDERS TO UPDATE HIS STORY - THIS WAS POSTED IN
DECEMBER 2006 AND IT APPEARS THAT HE PASSED ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2007


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