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Sam Bing lives in California, USA. He was 68 when he was diagnosed in October, 2010. His initial PSA was 11.00 ng/ml, his Gleason Score was 7, and he was staged T1c. His choice of treatment was Surgery (Robotic Laparoscopic Prostatectomy). Here is his story.

I am a member of Kaiser Permanente Northern California. I'm trying to decide between surgery and radiation. If surgery, robotic or not? My PC is close to one margin so the skill of doctor is critical. I'd like information on specific doctors' results but can't find any info on the internet. I'm getting second opinion at UCSF.

UPDATED

February 2011

Sam chose RALP (Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Surgery) and reports in his update:

I had major post-surgery complications (ileus where bowels shut down, pulmonary embolism, very large clot in bladder, testicular infection, reaction to sulfa drug) but now fully recovered. Current PSA is 0.02 ng/ml and I'm waiting for next PSA test to determine if radiation is needed.

Post surgery stage was T3c - there was SVI (Seminal Vesicle Invasion).

UPDATED

June 2012

Since my RLRP in late Nov. 2010 (18 mo), my PSA has been less than .02. I do an ultra-sensitive PSA test every 3 months. The low PSA has been a great relief since I had SVI. My surgeon was particularly aggressive because of the SVI but was able to spare nerves on one side.

My biggest complaint is inadquate erections. Penile injections worked the best but were somewhat painful and a hassle. so far none of the big 3 - cialis, levitra, viagra - have worked very well but my partner and I are managing to some extent. Life w/o good erections is still better than no life. I lost my friend and colleague at age 62 to PC. He opted for radiation. I'm glad to have it out. Sam


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