Walnut

Subscribe to RSS Feed for recent updates
Subscribe to RSS Feed for recent updates

YANA - YOU ARE NOT ALONE NOW

PROSTATE CANCER SUPPORT SITE

 

SURVIVOR STORIES  :  DISCUSSION FORUM  :  WIVES & PARTNERS  :  TELL YOUR STORY  :  UPDATE YOUR STORY  :  DONATIONS  :  TROOP-C

YANA HOME PAGE  :  DON'T PANIC  :  GOOD NEWS!  :  DIAGNOSIS  :  SURVIVING  :  TREATMENT CHOICES  :  RESOURCES  :  ABOUT US  :  MAIL US

 

  PLATINUM  
This member is a YANA Mentor This is his Country or State Flag

Dennis Newkirk and Marcia live in Oklahoma, USA. He was 48 when he was diagnosed in September, 1998. His initial PSA was 2.60 ng/ml, his Gleason Score was 6, and he was staged T1c. His choice of treatment was Surgery (Retropubic Prostatectomy). Here is his story.

My PSA has remained < 0.1 since surgery. I've done a great deal of research on Prostate Cancer and I would be happy to help anyone I can. I am not a physician.

UPDATED

November 2004

Dennis is now 55, his PSA is still below 0.10 ng/ml and he moves into Silver Status, having completed five years after his treatment.

UPDATED

March 2007

Dennis is now 57 and his PSA is 0.08 ng/ml after moving to a secondary treatment of Avodart after a slight PSA rise to .08 four years ago, I've had no changes.

UPDATED

July 2008

During my last visit with Dr. Charles "Snuffy" Myers he said that he really doubted that I have a recurrence even though I do have a detectable PSA. It is doubtful that there is any indicated doubling time. If there is, the doubling time is more than two years. His comment was, "At this rate, you'll be a 115 years old before it gives you any problems."

UPDATED

November 2009

My PSA reading in August was 0.16. Dr. Charles Myers of Charlottesville, VA remains unconvinced that the PSA is related to cancer. It may be a small amount of remaining post-RP prostate material. Even if it is cancer, the doubling rate is so slow the issue seems essentially irrelevant to him. In fact, he said that he didn't know what I would ultimately die from but it would not be PCa.

I remain on Avodart and watching my intake of certain foods. It has now been almost 12 years since I ate beef or pork, for example.

My primary advice to newly diagnosed men is to research before they decide that surgery or radiation is best. Also, pay careful attention to your emotions and thoughts. The greatest battle I have had from diagnosis, through treatment, and for some time after treatment was emotional not physical. The end of the word has not come! Don't give up.

UPDATED

February 2011

I'm now 13 year past surgery. My PSA is 0.20 rising very slowly. I have no plans for further adjuvant treatment at this time.

UPDATED

April 2012

I am now 14 years after surgery. My doctor, continues to say that I may have a small amount of prostate tissue left that is growing normally or it could be a small amount of cancer left. Whatever the case, after this period of time my doubling rate would be so slow that it will never create a problem. I rarely think of PCa any more. Though the years, I've had the privilege of talking with many men about their diagnosis and options. It is always my privilege to do so.

UPDATED

May 2013

No big changes for me. I had my annual PSA recently with only a minor adjust.

UPDATED

June 2014

Still doing well 16 years post op.

UPDATED

July 2015

Now 17 years post op. PSA is still low. This year I discontinued Avodart and experienced no rise in PSA. Prostate cancer does not come to my mind any longer. I am in a position to talk with many men who have been recently diagnosed and enjoy offering a word of encouragement and suggestion. A friend just went through a post op recurrence of PSA and chose proton therapy here in Oklahoma City. He was very pleased with the results.

UPDATED

March 2016

18 years post op. PSA .4 and no significant problems due surgery.

UPDATED

October 2016

Still enjoying low PSA since 1998.

Because of the work I do, I know many men with prostate cancer. Some react to it with little concern but many of us take this diagnosis hard. Having the support of others who have "been there, did that" is very helpful.

I encourage you to reach out and share your story with others. Be honest; others have experienced your emotions and may be of help. There is a lot of hope. There is life after prostate cancer.

Dennis's e-mail address is: dennisnewkirk@gmail.com


RETURN TO INDEX : RETURN TO HOME PAGE LINKS